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Tube Microphone in Studio

Freelance
Podcast Rate Card

Navigation:

1. How we created the rate card

2. How to use the rate card

3. The Rate Card

4. List of supporters


In order to create fair compensation and support the growth of the Australian podcast industry, a consortium of industry leaders, professionals, and content creators has established new industry standards for podcast rates. These standards aim to ensure that freelancers working in podcasting receive equitable compensation for their knowledge, valuable contributions and expertise.

 

How we created the rate card

These rates were developed through extensive industry consultation. They reflect freelancers need to cover their own entitlements such as leave and superannuation. They take into account such factors as the cost of living, the market rate, rates in similar industries, and rates in the podcast industry overseas.

 

How to use the rate card

The following information outlines the recommended rates for a freelancer working in the Australian podcast industry to charge a client per hour. Years of experience denotes years in the podcasting industry or other applicable roles. While these are hourly rates we encourage people in the podcast industry to charge by the half day.

How created
How to use

List of Supporters

The following people have signed on to publicly support the rate card. They have collectively worked with most of the major podcasting production companies in Australia including ABC, SBS, Listnr, The Wheeler Centre, ARN and The Guardian; and many international outlets including the BBC, NPR, Audible, Wondery, TED and Radiotopia.

 

Show your solidarity by signing the rate card.

Lea Redfern

Josh Brennan

Bronwin Patrickson

Lyndal Rowlands

Daniel Bacchieri

James Milsom

Ian Walker

Bindi Heit

Jaye Kranz

Alex Amster

Lindsey Green

Josh Butt

Myoung Jae Yi

Rob kaldor

Bonnie Lavelle

Xander Cross

Chiara Kemp

Max Gosford

Belinda Lopez

Ruth De Souza

Darius Kedros

Sana Qadar

Jacob Round

Jack Traynor

Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

Dan Schulz

Liz Clarkson

Louise Poole

Lia Tsamoglou

Karly Nimmo

Zacha Rosen

Jane Curtis

Mike Williams

Jon Tjhia

Michael Green

Nick King

Michelle Ransom-Hughes

Leith Alexander

Pariya Taherzadeh

Cinnamon Nippard

David McDonald

Sarah Bacaller

Megan Spencer

Joanne Helder

Mell Chun

Phoebe Adler-Ryan

Shareeka Helaluddin

Nathanael Little

Loretta Hart

Erielle Sudario

Lisa Taylor

Cara O'Brien

Natasha Mitchell

Miko Santos

Sarah Mashman

Roslyn Oades

Masako Fukui

Kyle McAuliffe Cronin

Ali Aitken

Rhys Gunter

Josh Liston

Elise Bradshaw

Ali Lemer

Phil Horn

Holly Mitchell

Jess O’Callaghan

Harry Hughes

Nic Huntington

Myjanne Jensen

Claudia Craig

Siobhan McHugh

Caroline Winter

James Milsom

Emily Naismith

Daniel Semo

Kate Lawrence

Janak Rogers

Laura Corrigan

Michelle Macklem

James Parkinson

Amelia Navascues

Ed Gooden

Jeremy Wilmot

Jay Gasser

Karla Arnall

Camilla Hannan

Celine Teo-Blockey

Catherine Green

Kyle Hopkins

Nicole Curby

Elle Marsh

Sam Loy

Lyndal Harris

Craig Garrett

Margaret Paton

Layla Palmer

Evan Munro-Smith

Maria Stoljar

Cherie Holland

Sophie Ellis

Anna Priestland

Rowena Murray

Sarah Steel

Rebecca Maakasa

Simon Beaton

Mike Liberale

Darren Scarce

Danni Stewart

Julia Carr-Catzel

Claudianna Blanco

Elise Cooper

Tiffany Dimmack

Kaspar Visser

Mia Lindgren

David Schreurs

Lem Zakharia

Paul Horan

Lawrence Bull

Claire Murphy

Alice Garner

Romy Sher

Gretchen Miller

Shiv Sumer

Corey Green

Mic Cavazzini

Ryan Pemberton

Courtney Carthy

Lindsey Green

Jennifer Macey

Lisa Divissi

Cheyne Anderson

Linda Bonney

Keeshia Pettit

Caddie Brain

Alex Tighe

Olivia Rosenman

Ian Curr

Role Descriptions

  • Producer
    The Producer takes a hands-on role, working directly with the content to build the podcast, making it an essential role for all podcast projects. A Producer takes on an organising role under the Executive Producer and/or Senior/Supervising Producer. They liaise with presenters and journalists to create content, or can work independently as creators. They are responsible for booking guests and conducting pre-interviews. A Producer writes interview questions, often in collaboration with a researcher or a journalist. They work with other team members to create scripts or assembly edits. A Producer may conduct interviews with or without a presenter, write scripts, create assembly edits and provide editorial feedback.
  • Senior/Supervising Producer
    A Senior or Supervising Producer provides guidance and support to producers. Typically, they’re producers with a higher level of experience, often across different styles of podcasts, meaning they’re expected to be able to navigate complicated reporting, storytelling, ethical and logistical issues that may be present during a production. Senior or Supervising Producers are most often used to provide highly specific feedback and support to Producers. This may include decisions around format, duration, guests and voices, the scope, framing and focus of stories, use of sound and language, and especially detailed notes on scripts and audio drafts.
  • Executive Producer
    The role of the Executive Producer is to broadly oversee a production and to shape the content, team and roles, schedule and resources accordingly. An Executive Producer will propose/pitch original ideas and develop concepts. They will think about the podcast's goals, the audience, how the podcast fits in with similar media, and how it aligns with a publisher or network’s broader output. They’ll often be responsible for advocating for, negotiating, or directing marketing and promotional support, as well as partnerships, advertising and monetisation strategy of a project. An EP gives feedback and direction on editorial, audio and creative aspects of a production. An EP will have familiarity with media law, but if they are concerned about risk then they would pass responsibility to a legal professional.
  • Story Editor
    A Story Editor works with a Producer to refine the tone, content and structure of a story, episode or segment. Their work often starts in the pre-production phase, where they help conceptualise the goals of a story. Throughout the process they will consult with journalists and researchers to ensure that a story is accurate, compelling and complete. A Story Editor will provide feedback for scripts and assembly edits, and may suggest conducting further recording or reporting, fact-checking, follow-up research, and re-writing.
  • Researcher
    A Researcher is assigned a topic by the Producer and investigates this topic thoroughly. They create a summary, and proposes appropriate interview subjects.
  • Fact-Checker
    A Fact-Checker verifies all assertions within a podcast for accuracy and fairness. A Fact-Checker would typically have a background in journalism, and it's expected that they have a strong understanding of media law.
  • Journalist
    At its core, the job of a Journalist is to gather, write and prepare stories for a news medium. We have not stated the rate for an audio/podcast journalist because they operate their own group.
  • Presenter
    A Podcast Presenter is a versatile performer with the gift of the gab. A Presenter may work with guests, they may discuss a particular topic, or they may have a conversation with other hosts. Our rate is for a non-celebrity presenter.
  • Studio Engineer
    A Studio Engineer operates a recording studio or a live broadcast studio. In the field of podcasting, they are also responsible for facilitating remote recordings/tape syncs. A Studio Engineer uses their expertise to make clear, consistent and intelligible recordings. A Studio Engineer would be responsible for recording a live event that is being held outside of a studio, such as at a theatre.
  • Tape Sync
    A Tape Sync is an audio producer who travels to an on-site location and records one side of a remote interview, sending the resulting files to the client soon after the recording. Tape Sync operators typically arrange their own transport and provide their own equipment. They ensure the remote guest is comfortable, that the environment is suitable for recording, and that communication between interviewer and guest is optimal. On occasion, they may be asked by the client to suggest additional questions or collect extra location sounds relevant to the production. The Tape Sync operator is typically expected to record 30-60 seconds of representative ‘silence’ (room tone) to support complicated edits. A Tape Sync is assumed to have access to standard broadcast-quality equipment.
  • Sound Recordist
    A Sound Recordist facilitates field recordings. They are responsible for sourcing and setting up equipment and trouble-shooting technical issues. They use their expertise to make clear, consistent and intelligible recordings in a wide variety of challenging conditions.
  • Audio Editor
    An Audio Editor is responsible for cutting and cleaning dialogue. This may involve assembling a collection of raw audio into a story with the aid of a script, or working from an assembly edit. The Audio Editor smooths transitions, removes filler words, and improves spacing and timing.
  • Sound Designer
    A Sound Designer establishes the sound and feeling of a show, episode or segment. They may be involved in early editorial decisions, influence the recording process, or they may work from a finished dialogue assembly. A Sound Designer is most notably responsible for the creative addition of music, sound effects and atmos to serve the story. They may source music using a sound library, or work with composers to build original music for the project. They often build cohesive scenes out of field recordings.
  • Composer
    A Composer writes original music for a podcast. They often work from a dialogue mixdown, or they might work with the Producer or Sound Designer to create a range of musical pieces that can be regularly incorporated into a show. We have not suggested pay rates for composition because this falls under the responsibility of Musicians Australia.
  • Mix Engineer
    A Mix Engineer will take a pre-existing session and improve balance, intelligibility and consistency. A Mix Engineer improves recording errors and poor edits and enhances audio recordings for intelligibility and artistic effect. Using tools such as compression and equalisation, a Mix Engineer will make different recordings sound consistent, and a story sound coherent.
  • Mastering Engineer
    A Mastering Engineer prepares an audio recording for distribution on different forms of media, including online distribution platforms, by ensuring that all audio specifications are met. These specifications include loudness standards, file formats and metadata. A Mastering Engineer uses their creative skill to finesse and polish a recording. We have not provided a rate for Mastering Engineers due to insufficient information.
  • Producer
    The Producer takes a hands-on role, working directly with the content to build the podcast, making it an essential role for all podcast projects. A Producer takes on an organising role under the Executive Producer and/or Senior/Supervising Producer. They liaise with presenters and journalists to create content, or can work independently as creators. They are responsible for booking guests and conducting pre-interviews. A Producer writes interview questions, often in collaboration with a researcher or a journalist. They work with other team members to create scripts or assembly edits. A Producer may conduct interviews with or without a presenter, write scripts, create assembly edits and provide editorial feedback.
  • Senior/Supervising Producer
    A Senior or Supervising Producer provides guidance and support to producers. Typically, they’re producers with a higher level of experience, often across different styles of podcasts, meaning they’re expected to be able to navigate complicated reporting, storytelling, ethical and logistical issues that may be present during a production. Senior or Supervising Producers are most often used to provide highly specific feedback and support to Producers. This may include decisions around format, duration, guests and voices, the scope, framing and focus of stories, use of sound and language, and especially detailed notes on scripts and audio drafts.
  • Executive Producer
    The role of the Executive Producer is to broadly oversee a production and to shape the content, team and roles, schedule and resources accordingly. An Executive Producer will propose/pitch original ideas and develop concepts. They will think about the podcast's goals, the audience, how the podcast fits in with similar media, and how it aligns with a publisher or network’s broader output. They’ll often be responsible for advocating for, negotiating, or directing marketing and promotional support, as well as partnerships, advertising and monetisation strategy of a project. An EP gives feedback and direction on editorial, audio and creative aspects of a production. An EP will have familiarity with media law, but if they are concerned about risk then they would pass responsibility to a legal professional.
  • Story Editor
    A Story Editor works with a Producer to refine the tone, content and structure of a story, episode or segment. Their work often starts in the pre-production phase, where they help conceptualise the goals of a story. Throughout the process they will consult with journalists and researchers to ensure that a story is accurate, compelling and complete. A Story Editor will provide feedback for scripts and assembly edits, and may suggest conducting further recording or reporting, fact-checking, follow-up research, and re-writing.
  • Researcher
    A Researcher is assigned a topic by the Producer and investigates this topic thoroughly. They create a summary, and proposes appropriate interview subjects.
  • Fact-Checker
    A Fact-Checker verifies all assertions within a podcast for accuracy and fairness. A Fact-Checker would typically have a background in journalism, and it's expected that they have a strong understanding of media law.
  • Journalist
    At its core, the job of a Journalist is to gather, write and prepare stories for a news medium. We have not stated the rate for an audio/podcast journalist because they operate their own group.
  • Presenter
    A Podcast Presenter is a versatile performer with the gift of the gab. A Presenter may work with guests, they may discuss a particular topic, or they may have a conversation with other hosts. Our rate is for a non-celebrity presenter.
  • Studio Engineer
    A Studio Engineer operates a recording studio or a live broadcast studio. In the field of podcasting, they are also responsible for facilitating remote recordings/tape syncs. A Studio Engineer uses their expertise to make clear, consistent and intelligible recordings. A Studio Engineer would be responsible for recording a live event that is being held outside of a studio, such as at a theatre.
  • Tape Sync
    A Tape Sync is an audio producer who travels to an on-site location and records one side of a remote interview, sending the resulting files to the client soon after the recording. Tape Sync operators typically arrange their own transport and provide their own equipment. They ensure the remote guest is comfortable, that the environment is suitable for recording, and that communication between interviewer and guest is optimal. On occasion, they may be asked by the client to suggest additional questions or collect extra location sounds relevant to the production. The Tape Sync operator is typically expected to record 30-60 seconds of representative ‘silence’ (room tone) to support complicated edits. A Tape Sync is assumed to have access to standard broadcast-quality equipment.
  • Sound Recordist
    A Sound Recordist facilitates field recordings. They are responsible for sourcing and setting up equipment and trouble-shooting technical issues. They use their expertise to make clear, consistent and intelligible recordings in a wide variety of challenging conditions.
  • Audio Editor
    An Audio Editor is responsible for cutting and cleaning dialogue. This may involve assembling a collection of raw audio into a story with the aid of a script, or working from an assembly edit. The Audio Editor smooths transitions, removes filler words, and improves spacing and timing.
  • Sound Designer
    A Sound Designer establishes the sound and feeling of a show, episode or segment. They may be involved in early editorial decisions, influence the recording process, or they may work from a finished dialogue assembly. A Sound Designer is most notably responsible for the creative addition of music, sound effects and atmos to serve the story. They may source music using a sound library, or work with composers to build original music for the project. They often build cohesive scenes out of field recordings.
  • Composer
    A Composer writes original music for a podcast. They often work from a dialogue mixdown, or they might work with the Producer or Sound Designer to create a range of musical pieces that can be regularly incorporated into a show. We have not suggested pay rates for composition because this falls under the responsibility of Musicians Australia.
  • Mix Engineer
    A Mix Engineer will take a pre-existing session and improve balance, intelligibility and consistency. A Mix Engineer improves recording errors and poor edits and enhances audio recordings for intelligibility and artistic effect. Using tools such as compression and equalisation, a Mix Engineer will make different recordings sound consistent, and a story sound coherent.
  • Mastering Engineer
    A Mastering Engineer prepares an audio recording for distribution on different forms of media, including online distribution platforms, by ensuring that all audio specifications are met. These specifications include loudness standards, file formats and metadata. A Mastering Engineer uses their creative skill to finesse and polish a recording. We have not provided a rate for Mastering Engineers due to insufficient information.
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